Lewis 1848 Topographical Dictionary

A Topographical Dictionary of England 1848

A seventh edition claimed to secure a condensed and accurate account of every place in the kingdom that held a civil or ecclesiastical jurisdiction. Summarising historic connections adds statistical interest, with strict alphabetical listing showing all places under their proper name, and any distinguishing epithet. The entire publication is found online through the British History site. Viewing entry just for Hucknall-under-Huthwaite unfortunately offered no new information, but identifying and extracting the following list of areas all related under the Workhouse Union of Mansfield aims at expanding local interests.

Areas in the Workhouse Union of Mansfield

MANSFIELD (St. Peter), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in the N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 14 miles (N. by W.) from Nottingham, and 138 (N. N. W.) from London; containing, with the hamlet of Pleasley-hill, 9788 inhabitants. The name of this place, anciently written Maunsfield, is derived from its situation on the small river Mann or Maun, which rises about three miles westward. The town is of great antiquity: it is supposed to have been of British or Roman origin; and during the heptarchy was a temporary residence of the Mercian kings, for the convenience of hunting in the Royal Forest of Sherwood. In the reigns of Edward the Confessor, William the Conqueror, and William Rufus, it was a royal demesne, and the place so continued till the time of Elizabeth, except that, in the reign of Henry VIII., it was, with other manors, held for a time by the Duke of Norfolk: it was ultimately granted away, by letters-patent, in the 44th of Elizabeth. Until the year 1715, the courts for the Forest of Sherwood, a district celebrated in ballad story as the scene of the exploits of the renowned archer, Robin Hood, and his band of freebooters, were held at Mansfield.

The town is situated on the road from Nottingham to Sheffield, in a deep vale, in the centre of the ancient forest, and has five chief streets, besides others branching from them, which are narrow and irregular; the houses are principally built of stone, and at the entrance to the town from Southwell are several excavated in the sandstone rock. Many improvements have been made within the last few years, under acts of parliament obtained in 1823 and 1825, agreeably with the provisions of one of which the town is lighted with gas, by a jointstock company; the approach from the Nottingham road has been widened, and the market-place considerably enlarged. Races take place at the July fair. The townhall, situated in the market-place, is a handsome structure of stone, in the Grecian style of architecture, erected by a company in 1836, at a cost of about £8000; it comprises a room for petty-sessions, a newsroom, library, and assembly and card rooms, with a police station, and a market-house and shambles, adjoining. The building forms a striking feature in the town.

In the parish are numerous establishments for Manufacturing purposes. Eleven of these are situated on the little rivers Maun and Medin, and are propelled by steam and water power. To insure a better supply of water for the mills, and for his extensive irrigation canals, the Duke of Portland a few years since constructed a reservoir of about 70 acres, on the site of an old flour-mill, and in the picturesque vale where it stood, famed by the story of "the Miller of Mansfield." This fine sheet of water forms a prominent object in the neighbourhood, and the mill-owners pay a yearly rent to the Duke of Portland for the advantage they derive from it. Most of the mills are the property of his grace. The king's mill, for grinding corn, is at the head of the reservoir, and in the occupation of Mr. W. Adlington. Hermitage mill, in the occupation of Mr. James Fisher, of Radford, is employed in the manufacture of lace, which is produced here of the most beautiful texture. The Bleakhills mill and Little Matlock mill are employed in making sewing-thread. The Field mill, on the Nottingham road, the largest in the parish, tenanted by Messrs. R. Greenhalgh and Sons; the Stanton mill, also held by Messrs. Greenhalgh; the Old mill, situated in the town; and the Bath mill, are all engaged in the manufacture of doubled-yarns used in the lace trade and other branches of production where cotton is the chief material consumed. They employ between 400 and 500 hands, and contain above 30,000 spindles. These four mills were erected for the spinning of cotton, and were so employed until the last few years; but this branch of the cotton trade has now left the neighbourhood, with the exception of the mills at Pleasley and two other places. Besides the above mills are, another lace factory, stocking and glove manufactures both of silk and cotton, bleaching-works, iron-foundries for light castings, two woodturning mills, and mustard, chicory, and tobacco manufactories. A very extensive business is carried on in malt, and also in cutting and working into blocks and architectural ornaments the fine freestone obtained in the adjacent quarries. The stone thus wrought is principally found in this and the neighbouring parish of Mansfield-Woodhouse; and mills of very ingenious construction for sawing it into slabs for flooring, and preparing it for building purposes, have been erected in and near the town, affording employment to a number of the population, and adding a new and important feature to the manufactures of the place. Branches of the Midland railway are in course of formation, to connect the town with Nottingham and other parts. In the reign of Henry III., the inhabitants procured a charter for a market on Monday, afterwards altered to Thursday; and also the privilege of housebote and haybot, or timber for repairs, and wood for fences, out of the forest, which they still enjoy. The market has been held on Thursday from time immemorial; and there are a fair on July 10th, for the sale of cattle and hogs, and a chartered fair on the second Thursday in October, for horses, cattle, sheep, and cheese. The powers of the county debt-court of Mansfield, established in 1847, extend over part of the registration-district of Mansfield. The town is the place of election for the Northern division of the county.

The parish comprises, according to the recent tithe commutation survey, 6447a. 3r. 27p., of which 2000 acres consist of uninclosed forest lands, 82 acres of wood and plantations, aud the remainder of meadow land, pasture, garden-ground, &c. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 7. 6.; present income, £400 per annum; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. A chaplaincy is attached to the church, for the support of which the vicar and churchwardens were incorporated, and invested with lands, in the 4th and 5th of Philip and Mary. The church exhibits specimens of each style, from the Norman to the later English; the two lower portions of the tower are early Norman, and there is one window in the early English style; the arches, piers, and north door, are of good decorated character: the tower is surmounted by a low spire. There are places of worship for Wesleyans, General Baptists, the Society of Friends, Independents, Primitive Wesleyans, and Unitarians. The free grammar school was founded by letters-patent of Elizabeth, dated March 8th, 1561: the lands belonging to it and to the chaplaincy having become undistinguishable, it was privately agreed after a suit in chancery, in 1682, that two-thirds of the income of the estate should be paid to the chaplain, and the remaining third to the master of the school and his assistant. A scholarship of £10 per annum was founded in 1673 at Jesus College, Cambridge, by Dr. Sterne, Archbishop of York, for a native of Mansfield. A free school was established in 1702. In 1709, Samuel Brunt bequeathed lands, directing the proceeds, which then amounted to £436. 15. a year, to be applied chiefly to the relief of poor inhabitants. In 1725, Faith Clerkson left the sum of £2000 to trustees, partly for erecting two schoolhouses, and partly to be vested in land, the rental to be divided between Mansfield and Mansfield-Woodhouse; and in 1784, Charles Thompson bequeathed £1200 in the three per cents., one-half for the augmentation of Brunt's charity, and one-half for educating children, for whom a school was built in Toothill-lane. The present income of Brunt's charity, including Thompson's bequest, amounts to £1049. By deed dated January 15th, 1691, Elizabeth Heath founded almshouses for twelve persons, and endowed them with property now producing a rental of £244. 9., of which £70 are appropriated to the apprenticing of children: the trustees have recently built six additional almshouses, of stone, in Bull's Head lane. The poor-law union of Mansfield comprises 18 parishes or places, of which 9 are in each of the counties of Nottingham and Derby, the whole containing a population of 27,627 inhabitants: the workhouse is a large building on the Sutton road, erected in 1837, at a cost of £7000, and containing accommodation for 300 paupers. The savings' bank, in the market-place, was built in 1843.

Humphrey Ridley, an eminent physician and anatomist, was born here about 1653. Archbishop Sterne, and Dr. William Chappel, Bishop of Cork and Ross, in Ireland, were also natives of Mansfield: Robert Dodsley, author of the Economy of Human Life, was born in the vicinity, and apprenticed in the town; and James Murray, inventor of the patent circular saw, resided here. Sir William Murray, on being appointed lord chief justice of the court of king's bench, was elevated to the peerage, in 1756, by the title of Baron Mansfield, of which place he was created earl in 1776.

AULT-HUCKNALL, a parish, in the union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 5½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Mansfield; containing, with the hamlets of Rowthorne and Stainsby, 678 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 4285 acres, the soil of which is two-thirds sandstone, and one-third magnesian limestone; and forms a fine agricultural district. The manor of Hardwicke lies on the south side of the parish, and on the border of Nottinghamshire, from which it is separated by the river Meden or Mayden. It was granted by King John, in 1203, to Andrew de Beauchamp: the Hardwickes possessed it for six generations; and Elizabeth, daughter of John Hardwicke, Esq., brought it to Sir William Cavendish, from whom it descended to its now noble possessor, the Duke of Devonshire.

The present Hall of Hardwicke was built by the Countess of Shrewsbury in the reign of Elizabeth; its situation is exceedingly picturesque and beautiful, standing in a fine park containing 621 acres of land, embellished with venerable oaks of most gigantic size. It is of stone, with a parapet of open work at the top, and at each extremity a lofty tower. The state apartments are very magnificent; several of the rooms are hung with tapestry of exquisite workmanship, particularly the audience hall, where is represented the story of Ulysses. The gallery is about 170 feet long and 26 wide, extending the whole length of the eastern side of the house, and hung with tapestry, on a part of which is the date 1478: it is probable that this, as well as many articles of the furniture, celebrated for its antique character, was removed from the old Hall, or from Chatsworth when that splendid mansion was being rebuilt. Among other excellent pictures, are portraits of Elizabeth, Lady Jane Grey, Sir Thomas More, Cardinal Pole, Bishop Gardiner, the first earl of Devonshire, and Thomas Hobbes. The ancient Hall, standing near the mansion, appears to have been a very fine structure, and, from its style of architecture, could not have been built any great length of time before the present edifice. The living of the parish is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 0. 5.; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Devonshire. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £105, and there are more than 27 acres of glebe; the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £34. At Hardwicke is a school, towards the support of which Thomas Whitehead, in 1729, bequeathed a house and land producing £23. 15. per annum; it is also endowed with property in the parish of Edensor.

BLACKWELL (St. Werburgh), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 3¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Alfreton; containing 477 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1675 acres, and abounds in coal, which is close to the surface; two mines are at present worked, affording employment to a part of the population, and about 50 persons are engaged in the stocking manufacture. Stone is quarried for road-making. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 4. 2.; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Devonshire: the great tithes have been commuted for £170, and the vicarial for £101; the glebe consists of an acre and a half. The church was rebuilt in 1824; its site is a bed of coal, which, a short distance from it, has a peculiar appearance, jutting out four or five yards above the turnpike-road: the churchyard contains one of the oldest yew-trees in England. There is a place of worship for dissenters.

BLIDWORTH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, Southwell division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 5 miles (S. S. E.) from Mansfield; containing, with the hamlets of Lower Blidworth, Bottoms, Fishpool, and Rainworth, and the extra-parochial places of Lindhurst and Haywood-Oaks, 1154 inhabitants. At the time of the Norman survey this formed a berewick to Oxton, and in the 3rd of Henry V. was given by that monarch to the college of Southwell. The parish comprises 5302a. 3r. 10p. The village is nearly in the centre of the ancient forest of Sherwood, in all the perambulations of which, from the reign of Henry I. to that of Charles II., it is mentioned as a forest town: it is pleasantly situated upon an eminence, surrounded by some of the finest scenery of the forest. The "Queen's Bower" and "Langton Arbour" are still pointed out as the sites of hunting-seats of King John; and "Fountain Dale" and "Rainworth" are both celebrated in the annals and ballads of Robin Hood. Rainworth gives name to the forest rivulet that rises near Robin Hood's hills. A portion of the population is employed as frame-work knitters of stockings, and in glove-making and running lace. A fair for sheep is held on Old Michaelmas-day. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4, and was till lately in the alternate gift of the two prebendaries of Oxton, on the decease of one of whom, his right of patronage devolved to the Bishop of Ripon; net income, £188. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1769 and 1806; the glebe comprises 140 acres. The original church becoming dilapidated, the present edifice was erected in 1740, and re-roofed and enlarged in 1839 at an expense of above £1000. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In a field near the village is a rocky formation of sand and gravel, commonly called plum-pudding stone; it is fourteen feet high and eighty-four in circumference, and is supposed to have been a Druidical idol. At the inclosure in 1806, upwards of 1000 acres were planted, which are now in a very flourishing condition.

BOTTOMS, a hamlet, in the parish of Blidworth, union of Mansfield, Southwell division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham; containing 250 inhabitants.

FISHPOOL, a hamlet, in the parish of Blidworth, union of Mansfield, Southwell division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham; containing 92 inhabitants.

FULWOOD, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Mansfield, N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 5½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Mansfield; containing 6 inhabitants. It comprises 120 acres of land.

GLAPWELL, a township, in the parish of Bolsover, union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 5¼ miles (N. W.) from Mansfield: containing 91 inhabitants. Here was a chapel, which in 1240 belonged to Darley Abbey, but of which no later account exists than in 1511.

HAYWOOD-OAKS, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Mansfield, Southwell division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 6 miles (S. E.) from Mansfield; containing 12 inhabitants, and comprising 666 acres.

HUCKNALL-UNDER-HUTHWAITE, a hamlet, in the parish of Sutton-in-Ashfield, union of Mansfield, N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 5 miles (W. by S.) from Mansfield; containing 887 inhabitants. It comprises 800 acres of land. Here is an extensive colliery; and many of the inhabitants are engaged in frame-work knitting. The village is one mile and a half west-northwest of that of Sutton. The Independents and Wesleyans have places of worship.

LANGWITH (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 6 miles (N. by W.) from Mansfield; containing 194 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1360 acres, of which 230 are woodland, and the remainder chiefly arable; the surface is diversified with hill and dale, and the scenery enriched with wood, principally oak, ash, and elm. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 0. 2½., and in the gift of the Duke of Devonshire: the tithes have been commuted for £195, and the glebe comprises 44 acres. The church is a small ancient structure, and appears to have been originally of larger dimensions. A school is supported by endowment.

LINDHURST, an extra-parochial place, in the union of Mansfield, Southwell division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham; comprising 716 acres, and containing 10 inhabitants.

MANSFIELD-WOODHOUSE (St. Edmund), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 1¾ mile (N.) from Mansfield; containing 1871 inhabitants. This place, which anciently formed part of the parish of Mansfield, has undergone much improvement, and several hundred acres of barren waste have been converted into rich meadow land, by a judicious system of irrigation adopted by the Duke of Portland, who caused a canal to be cut through this parish and Clipstone, communicating with the river Maun. About 1300 acres here, with some land in Mansfield, constitute the only uninclosed portion of the ancient Forest of Sherwood. The substratum abounds with limestone of good quality, and there are extensive limekilns, and quarries of excellent freestone. The stone from the quarries of this vicinity has of late years obtained very great celebrity, and is of three varieties, the Woodhouse or Bolsover stone, and the Mansfield red, and Mansfield white, stone. The first, a most durable magnesian limestone, was chosen for the erection of the new houses of parliament at Westminster, for which purpose quarries were opened here by Mr. Lindley, the proprietor, on a hill bearing evident marks of having been quarried at a very remote period, and from which the stone used in the older portions of Southwell cathedral was extracted. It had long been matter of conjecture whence the material came of which that edifice was built, few structures of as early a date having their mouldings and finer carvings so well preserved; but from strict comparison of the stone of the cathedral with the beds in these quarries, no doubt now exists of the stone having been obtained from this place. On a part of the same range of limestone rock, is quarried a material which may be classed among British marbles, but its great solidity increases the difficulty of raising it, and prevents its being applied to ordinary building purposes. It possesses the transparency, and is susceptible of the polish, of foreign marble, with a slight tinge of colour sufficient to distinguish it from white. Of this marble, the memorial erected at Oxford to the Martyrs is composed.

The village is large, and contains several very respectable houses; many of the inhabitants are employed in frame-work knitting. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £94; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Portland. The church is a large structure, with a spire, which was rebuilt in 1304, with one of the aisles, after having been injured by a fire, which also destroyed part of the village. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. A free school was founded by Faith Clerkson, in 1725, and endowed with land; Richard Radford, by deed dated May 10th, 1827, gave £800 for another school. In 1786, Major Rooke discovered two Roman villæ in the parish: one of them contained nine rooms and a hypocaust, with part of a very elegant mosaic pavement in the centre room; the other contained thirteen rooms, two hypocausts, and a cold bath. About 100 yards to the south-east were two Roman sepulchres, in one of which was an urn containing ashes, with fragments of bones lying near it; and coins and various other Roman relics were also found. Dr. Mason, Bishop of Sodor and Man, was born in the parish.

NORMANTON, SOUTH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 2 miles (E. N. E.) from Alfreton; containing 1288 inhabitants. This parish, for many generations from the time of the Conquest, was the residence of the family of Revel, whose mansion was at Carnfield Hall. It lies on the Mansfield and Alfreton road, and comprises 1879a. 2r. 31p., nearly equally divided into arable and pasture, with a few plantations. The surface is undulated; the soil clay, cold, and unproductive; and the scenery pleasingly diversified: the substratum abounds with coal of good quality, of which some mines are in operation. The village is situated on an eminence; the inhabitants are chiefly employed in the collieries, and in frame-work knitting, which is carried on to a considerable extent. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 15. 5., and in the gift of Thomas Radford, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £285, and the glebe comprises 60 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure, with two aisles, and a tower and pinnacles: the communion-plate, which is very handsome, was presented by the family of Revel. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have places of worship. There is a small day school; and a Church Sunday school, built in 1840, is supported by subscription. Fossil remains of plants, fish, and shells are sometimes found. Jedediah Strutt, Esq., the ingenious inventor of the machine for manufacturing ribbed stockings, was born here.

PINXTON (St. Helena), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 3 miles (E. by S.) from Alfreton; containing 889 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1260 acres, and is situated on the southeast border of Derbyshire. It is intersected by the Erewash canal, and the Cromford branch canal terminates at Pinxton, whence a railway extends to Mansfield, passing through a country abounding with minerals, and in which means of transport were previously much wanted. In the neighbourhood of the wharfs has arisen a considerable village called New Pinxton. Some coal mines are worked. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 0. 10., and in the gift of D'Ewes Coke, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £228, and the glebe comprises about 40 acres. The church, situated at some distance from the village, is a neat edifice, with a tower of ancient date on one side of the chancel: the nave and chancel were built about a century ago. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school partly supported by D'Ewes Coke, Esq.

PLEASELEY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 3½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Mansfield; containing, with the chapelry of Shirebrook and the hamlet of Stoney-Houghton, 679 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Nottingham to Chesterfield, and comprises about 3000 acres of land, chiefly arable; 300 acres are woodland and plantation, consisting of oak, elm, larch, and ash. Limestone abounds; and here are some considerable manufactories for cotton-thread, hosiery, &c., principally for the Nottingham market. Pleaseley had anciently a market on Monday, granted in 1284 to Thomas Bec, Bishop of St. David's, with a fair for three days; the former has been long disused, but fairs are still held on May 6th and October 29th, for cattle, horses, and sheep. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 4. 7.; patron, W. P. Thornhill, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £643, and the glebe consists of 55 acres. The church is an ancient stone edifice, remarkably long and narrow: in the steeple is a large chasm, caused by the shock of an earthquake, which was felt over a great part of the midland counties, on March 17th, 1816. There is a chapel of ease at Shirebrook. In a park adjoining the cotton-mills is a large inclosure with a double vallum and intrenchments, two sides of which are secured by natural precipices; it is 250 feet in length by 195 in breadth, and is evidently a Saxon work.

PLEASELY-HILL, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Mansfield, N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham; containing 400 inhabitants.

SCARCLIFFE (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 6 miles (N. N. W.) from Mansfield; containing 582 inhabitants. The parish comprises the villages of Scarcliffe and Palterton, and the hamlets of Scarcliffe-Lane, Stockley, and Riley; and contains 3772 acres, of which 400 are wood. The surface is diversified by hill and dale; the soil in some parts is a calcareous loam, and in others a calcareous clay: there are some quarries of limestone. The village of Scarcliffe is situated on the Rotherham road. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5; net income, £68; patron, the Duke of Devonshire; impropriator, Earl Bathurst. The glebe consists of 14 acres of arable land, and there is a glebe-house. The church is situated on a gentle hill, in the centre of the village. The exterior of the nave is disfigured by alterations made in the two last centuries: the spire, which was unsafe, was taken down in 1842, and a tower erected in its place, at a cost of £500; it is a plain structure, in the Norman style, with pointed arches. In the chancel are a piscina, a tomb of the 13th century, and a statue of the 11th century. The last is of a lady, with her child, and is formed of a block of stone: she is represented in robes, with a coronet on her head, and from her breasts downwards is an inscription in Latin, in Lombardic characters. Tradition says, that this lady, whose name was Constantia, lost her way while journeying through a neighbouring forest, and that, attracted by the sound of the curfew at the church, she reached the village, where she died in childbirth, leaving property in jewels to purchase land to pay for the curfew being rung for ever. Some land belonging to the parish, said to have been purchased in consequence, now lets for £4. 10. a year. In the village is a school endowed with £6. per annum by Mrs. Vaughan, and having £6 yearly from Earl Bathurst.

SHIREBROOK, a chapelry, in the parish of Pleasley, union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 5½ miles (N. by W.) from the town of Mansfield.

SKEGBY, a parish, in the union of Mansfield, N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 3 miles (W.) from Mansfield; containing 775 inhabitants. It comprises 1425 acres, of which 50 are plantation, and the remainder arable and pasture. The substratum contains coal, of which some mines are in operation, and limestone, which is quarried for burning into lime. The Skegby lime, recently discovered, is equal to cement for the erection of bridges, constructing pit-works, lining water-cisterns, &c.; it was used for the bridges, tunnels, &c, of the North Midland railway. John Dodsley, Esq., lord of the manor, resides at the Hall, and occasionally holds a court. The village is pleasantly situated on the opposite acclivities of a deep valley, near the source of the river Meden; the inhabitants are partly employed in frame-work knitting. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £78; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Portland, as lessee under the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln. The church is a small stone edifice with a tower, on an eminence some distance from the village; it contains monuments to the Lindley family. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. A Sunday school has been established.

SOKEHOLME, a chapelry, in the parish of Warsop, union of Mansfield, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Mansfield; containing 66 inhabitants, and comprising an area of 984 acres.

STAINSBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Ault-Hucknall, union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 5¾ miles (S. E.) from Chesterfield; containing 101 inhabitants.

SUTTON-IN-ASHFIELD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 3½ miles (W. S. W.) from Mansfield; containing, with the hamlet of Hucknall-under-Huthwaite, 6557 inhabitants, of whom 5670 are in Sutton township. The village is situated on an eminence, and comprises several streets, covering a considerable extent of ground: limestone of excellent quality abounds in the vicinity. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in the manufacture of cotton hose and lace. A few persons find employment in making a coarse kind of red pottery ware; and the Mansfield and Pinxton railway, which passes through the parish, affords facility for conveying the produce. A book society has been established for several years. There is a small customary market for provisions on Saturday. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, without surplice fees, £100; patron, the Duke of Devonshire; impropriator, the Duke of Portland: the tithes were commuted for land in 1794. The church, which stands on an eminence, has a handsome octagonal spire. There are places of worship for General and Particular Baptists, Independents, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans; and a national school for boys is partly supported by about £10 per annum from benefactions. Near the village is Mapple Wells, the water of which has been successfully used in rheumatic cases. Joseph Whitehead, a frame-work knitter, remarkable for his attainments in astronomy and mechanics, and who constructed an orrery upon Ferguson's principle, and other complicated pieces of machinery, was born here in 1784.

TEVERSAL (St. Catherine), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, N. division of the hundred of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 4½ miles (W. by N.) from Mansfield; containing 423 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 2500 acres, of which 1050 are arable, 1343 pasture, and 155 wood: the population is entirely agricultural, with the exception of a few persons employed ill stocking-frame weaving. Part of Hardwick Park, the property of the Duke of Devonshire, extends into the parish. The Earl of Carnarvon is lord of the manor. Coal and limestone abound, but neither is now worked. The village is situated on a lofty eminence, near the source of the river Meden; and there are three hamlets, Fackley, Stanley, and Whiteborrow. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 19. 2., and in the gift of the Earl of Carnarvon: the tithes have been commuted for £522. 8.; the glebe contains nearly 42 acres. The church is in the Norman style, and has several old monuments of the Greenhalghe, Babington, and Molyneux families: over the chief entrance is a curious and beautiful Norman arch with symbolical representations of religious subjects. South of the church are the extensive ruins of the ancient mansion-house, built by Gilbert Greenhalghe in the reign of Henry VII., and the remains of a hanging garden on a magnificent scale: part of the mansion is now converted into a farmhouse.

WARSOP (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 5¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Mansfield; containing with the chapelry of Sokeholme, 1384 inhabitants, of whom 1318 are in Warsop township. The parish comprises 6953a. 3r. 10p., of which about 200 acres are in woods and plantations; the soil is of a sandy nature, and incumbent on limestone, which is quarried for roads and building, and for burning into lime. The forest land was partly inclosed in 1775, and the remainder by an act of 1818. The small river Meden, and the road from Nottingham, through Mansfield, to Worksop and Doncaster, intersect the parish. The village is considerable, and fairs for cattle and horses are held in it on the Monday before Whitsuntide, on September 29th, and November 17th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £22. 15. 2½.; net income, £1020; patrons, the Knight family. The tithes were commuted for land in 1818; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe altogether contains 713¾ acres. The church is a neat edifice, thoroughly repaired in 1831, at a cost of £600. In Sokeholme is a chapel of ease. Thomas Whiteman, in 1811, bequeathed £400 for instruction, now producing £15. 15. per annum. Dr. Samuel Hallifax, Bishop of St. Asaph, a prelate of deep erudition, died also rector of this parish, in 1790.


Written 08 May 07 Revised 24 Feb 09 © by Gary Elliott