Huthwaite War Memorial Project

GASCOIGNE A. 25929

Arthur Gascoygne

Arthur Gascoigne

Private 25929 - King's Own D Company
Royal Lancaster Regiment 19th Battalion

Died of Wounds Salonika 18th Apr 1918 : Aged 23

Karasouli Military Cemetary - A 103

Arthur was born and continued living on Barker Street with his mother when formerly working at the Co-op in Huthwaite. Slight variations for given surname Gascoigne are found among press reports, but do reveal more about him than offered by a basic military record. It is from finding the family headstone that still proudly stands in Huthwaite cemetery with a clear inscription also commemorating their son Arthur, that confirms he died aged 23, an only son of John who died 1907, and finally his mother named Eliza.


GascoigneIN MEMORY OF JOHN
BELOVED HUSBAND OF ELIZA GASCOIGNE, WHO DIED JAN 3RD 1907, AGED 53 YEARS.
ALSO ELIZA, WIFE OF THE ABOVE, DIED JUNE 16TH 1921, AGED 64 YEARS.
ALSO PTE. ARTHUR GASCOIGNE KILLED AT SALONICA APRIL 18TH 1918, AGED 23 YEARS.
Notts. Free Press - 10th May, 1918.

Private A. Gascoyne, Huthwaite

Official news has been received on April 18th. of the death from wounds of Private Arthur Gascoyne, 25929, D Company, 9th. Battalion, King's Own Royal Lancasters. He was 22 years of age, and lived in Barker Street, Huthwaite. He went out to Salonika in October, 1917. Three letters have been received which were written by him to different people on the 16th. April. And in them he declared himself to be "in the pink," yet two days later he died of wounds. Before enlisting he was employed at the Huthwaite Co-operative Branch.
Notts Free Press – 17th May, 1918.

PRIVATE A. GASCOIGNE, HUTHWAITE.

Concerning the death of Pte. A. Gascoigne, Barker Street, Huthwaite – recorded in our last issue - the following letters have been received

"I am sorry to have the painful duty of informing you of the death from wounds received in action on April 17th of your son 25929 Pte. Gascoigne. It happened whilst he was on post, a shell unfortunately striking where he and two companions were standing. He died nobly doing his duty, and I extend to you the deepest sympathy of his Company comrades and myself in your great bereavement." - 2nd Lieut. T. Parker.
“I am writing to express to you my deep sympathy in the loss of your son, Pte. A Gascoigne. Until some six weeks ago it was my pleasant duty to command the Company in which your son was. I knew him well, for I had good cause to since he was one of the most reliable and trustworthy men in my Company. His own particular job, as you no doubt know, was that of a Lewis gunner, and in that capacity he could not be beaten. He was always refreshingly cheerful, and on all occasions turned up smiling, no matter what was going on. He refused to be downcast, which we all know counts for so much in these days of hardship. You may believe me that he is very deeply missed by all the men and officers in his Company, and particularly by his own friends, for he must have been a friend indeed. The Battalion to which he belonged is undergoing many changes; people come and go, but I know that it is always the going that is hardest, both for those who leave and for those left behind. I will always be pleased to help if it lies within my power.
-From Capt. T.W. Harbey.

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Written 23 Jul 06 Revised 13 Jul 12 © by Gary Elliott